FAA Approval

All FlyThisSim® TouchTrainer® flight simulators are approved by the Federal Aviation Administration as a Basic Aviation Training Device (BATD). This historic first in FAA approvals allows FTS to make extensive use of computer graphics and touch screens to replace physical switches, levers, and knobs. The result is a more aircraft specific, versatile, and cost effective training device providing all the privileges of an FAA approval.

Whether you are a licensed pilot, a student pilot, an operator, or a flight school, Our FAA approved flight simulators allow you and your students to log time during your flight training. Current instrument pilots can use their TouchTrainers® to legally maintain instrument flight currency when the NPRN is finally approved. Read the NPRM by clicking HERE. FTS simulators are basic advanced training systems, allowing FTS TouchTrainer® systems to take advantage of high end computer graphics, magnificent proprietary visual display systems, and innovative touch screen control systems to simulate avionics and panels normally produced through physical instrument devices. This allows FTS TouchTrainer® simulators to be more aircraft specific, versatile, quickly reconfigurable, and effectively priced while offering the most realistic simulated cockpits and visual system in the industry. With a FlyThisSim® TouchTrainer® you can TRAIN THE WAY YOU FLY!

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Approval Documentation

AC61-136A provides guidance for the approval of aviation training devices. The TouchTrainer® is authorized for use in satisfying the following Tasks/Maneuvers and Procedures under the following sections and appendixes of the Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 61 and 141. Here is our Letter of Approval for fixed wing: FlyThisSim® TouchTrainer® Fixed Wing 03/30/2016. Here is our Letter of Approval for rotary wing: FlyThisSim® TouchTrainer® Helicopter 03/30/2016

Section 61.51(b)(3)

TouchTrainer® usage may be Logged.

Section 61.57(c)(3)

Use of an aviation training device for maintaining instrument experience. Within the 2 calendar months preceding the month of the flight, that person performed and logged at least the following tasks, iterations, and time in an aviation training device and has performed the following:

(i) Three hours of instrument experience.

(ii) Holding procedures and tasks.

(iii) Six instrument approaches.

(iv) Two unusual attitude recoveries while in a descending, Vne airspeed condition and two unusual attitude recoveries while in an ascending, stall speed condition.

(v) Interception and tracking courses through the use of navigational electronic systems.

Section 61.65(i)(2)

Instrument Rating: Up to 10 hours instruction can be logged towards your instrument rating

Section 61.109(k)(1)

Private Pilot Certificate: Up to 2.5 hours in the introduction to the operation of flight instruments can be logged towards your private pilot rating

Section 141.41(b)

Appendix C to 14 CFR part 141: Can be used as part of an FAA approved instrument rating course, but not more than 10 hours

Logging Instrument Approaches

The FAA Flight Standards Service, Washington, DC issued this clarification letter on 9/8/15. It details what is required to log an instrument approach in an aircraft and simulator. It mentions that a safety pilot must be in attendance in an aircraft (because a view limiting device) it makes NO mention of having a safety pilot or instructor present in the simulator. However NOT referenced is 61.51.g(4) which applies to all simulators AATD and BATD from all manufacturers.

61.51.g(4) A person can use time in a flight simulator, flight training device, or aviation training device for acquiring instrument aeronautical experience for a pilot certificate, rating, or instrument recency experience, provided an authorized instructor is present to observe that time and signs the person's logbook or training record to verify the time and the content of the training session.

A clarification (a preamble) by the FAA stating an instructor IS NOT required to sign off approaches flown in an ATD appears to have been rescinded and this issue was forwarded to the Flight Standards Service for further clarification. To our knowledge there has been no further clarification but the letter stands. So it appears you will need an instructor every two months to sign off approaches done in an ATD.

Logging Approaches Every 6 Months

Maybe there is a a better approach than 61 57 c(3). A mix of recency flying in both the aircraft and an ATD. Looking at 61.57(c)(4)( i) (A) below note the requirement for "APPROACHES" in an airplane. Clearly, the word APPROACHES is plural. The requirements of 61.57(c)(4) (iii) are very clear -- six instrument approaches in a BATD in addition to the other requirements every 6 months, not the 2 months required by 61.57(c)(3). The LOA for our BATD does not include a reference to FAR 61.57(c)(4). However, we have an email from the FAA to FTS which clarifies the matter and does, if fact, allow currency under FAR 61.57(c)(4).

Section 61.57(c)(4)

Combination of completing instrument experience in an aircraft and a flight simulator, flight training device, and aviation training device. A person who elects to complete the instrument experience with a combination of an aircraft, flight simulator or flight training device, and aviation training device must have performed and logged the following within the 6 calendar months preceding the month of the flight—

(i) Instrument experience in an airplane, powered-lift, helicopter, or airship, as appropriate, for the instrument rating privileges to be maintained, performed in actual weather conditions, or under simulated weather conditions while using a view-limiting device, on the following instrument currency tasks:

(A) Instrument approaches.

(B) Holding procedures and tasks.

(C) Interception and tracking courses through the use of navigational electronic systems.

(ii).........

(iii) Instrument experience in an aviation training device that represents the category of aircraft for the instrument rating privileges to be maintained and involves performing at least the following tasks—

(A) Six instrument approaches.

(B) Holding procedures and tasks.

(C) Interception and tracking courses through the use of navigational electronic systems.

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